Tim Gunn: Designers Refuse To Make Clothes To Fit American Women. It’s A Disgrace.

When I was chief creative officer for Liz Claiborne Inc., I spent a good amount of time on the road hosting fashion shows highlighting our brands. Our team made a point of retaining models of various sizes, shapes and ages, because one of the missions of the shows was to educate audiences about how they could look their best. At a Q&A after one event in Nashville in 2010, a woman stood up, took off her jacket and said, with touching candor: "Tim, look at me. I'm a box on top, a big, square box. How can I dress this shape and not look like a fullback?" It was a question I'd heard over and over during the tour: Women who were larger than a size 12 always wanted to know, How can I look good, and why do designers ignore me?

At New York Fashion Week, which began Thursday, the majority of American women are unlikely to receive much attention, either. Designers keep their collections tightly under wraps before sending them down the runway, but if past years are any indication of what's to come, plus-size looks will be in short supply. Sure, at New York Fashion Week in 2015, Marc Jacobs and Sophie Theallet each featured a plus-size model, and Ashley Graham debuted her plus-size lingerie line. But these moves were very much the exception, not the rule.

I love the American fashion industry, but it has a lot of problems, and one of them is the baffling way it has turned its back on plus-size women. It's a puzzling conundrum. The average American woman now wears between a size 16 and a size 18, according to new research from Washington State University. There are 100 million plus-size women in America, and, for the past three years, they have increased their spending on clothes faster than their straight-size counterparts. There is money to be made here ($20.4 billion, up 17 percent from 2013). But many designers -- dripping with disdain, lacking imagination or simply too cowardly to take a risk -- still refuse to make clothes for them.

In addition to the fact that most designers max out at size 12, the selection of plus-size items on offer at many retailers is paltry compared with what's available for a size 2 woman. According to a Bloomberg analysis, only 8.5 percent of dresses on Nordstrom.com in May were plus-size. At J.C. Penney's website, it was 16 percent; Nike.com had a mere five items - total.

Source : http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/style/ct-tim-gunn-clothes-american-women-20160910-story.html

Tim Gunn: Designers refuse to make clothes to fit American women. It's a disgrace.
Tim Gunn Says It's A Disgrace That Designers Don't Make Clothes For Plus-Size Women
Fashions fit for American women? Designers refuse to make them – and it’s a disgrace
Tim Gunn: Designers refuse to make clothes to fit American women. It's a disgrace.
Tim Gunn: Designers refuse to make clothes to fit American women. It's a disgrace
Tim Gunn: Designers refuse to make clothes to fit American women. It's a disgrace.
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